Spanish Town Mardi Gras Parade



Spanish Town Mardi Gras Photo 04

Spanish Town is a quirky little neighborhood with narrow streets lined with historic homes located in downtown Baton Rouge. It is the oldest neighborhood in Baton Rouge, first settled by Spanish and Canary Islanders around 1805, just two years after the Louisiana Purchase was signed. It was the first neighborhood we looked at when we decided to move down South, but nothing is ever for sale because the people who live there love it and never want to leave.

The annual Spanish Town Mardi Gras parade (running since 1981) is the most famous of all Baton Rouge parades and rolls on the Saturday before Mardi Gras day. I swear, there must have been at least ten thousand people in attendance this year, even in the pouring rain. The parade’s symbol is the flamingo, and there were flamingo’s everywhere!

Spanish Town Mardi Gras Photo 01

Spanish Town Mardi Gras Photo 02

Spanish Town Mardi Gras Photo 03

Spanish Town Mardi Gras Photo 05

Spanish Town Mardi Gras Photo 06

Spanish Town Mardi Gras Photo 07

Spanish Town Mardi Gras Photo 08

Spanish Town Mardi Gras Photo 09

Spanish Town Mardi Gras Photo 10

Spanish Town Mardi Gras Photo 11

Spanish Town Mardi Gras Photo 12

Old State Capitol Building



Old State Capitol

I wandered around a bit this morning and ended up at the Old State Capitol building. It was built in 1847 in the Gothic Revival style and was designed to look like a medieval castle (complete with turrets). It was torched during the Civil War but was refurbished and now serves as a museum of political history.

The writer, Mark Twain wasn’t a fan of the look.

He said, “It is pathetic enough, that a whitewashed castle, with turrets and things–materials all ungenuine within and without, pretending to be what they are not– should ever have been built in this otherwise honorable place; but it is much more pathetic to see this architectural falsehood undergoing restoration and perpetuation in our day, when it would have been so easy to let dynamite finish what a charitable fire began, and then devote this restoration-money to the building of something genuine.”.

Below is a mason’s mark from the cornerstone, a shot from the staircase, and some picts from the Huey Long exhibit.

Old State Capitol Mason's Mark
Old State Capitol Ceiling
Huey Long
Huey Long Statue

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